GPS-C and GPS-T

Global Psychotrauma Screen for children and teenagers

GPS-C
GPS-T

The GPS-C (6-10 years) in short

  • The Global Psychotrauma Screen (GPS) is a screening instrument designed to identify reactions to a severe stressor or potentially traumatic event (16 yes/no questions).

  • The are no questions about the nature or type of the event.

  • It can be used in different settings such as in primary care, after disaster, or in clinical practice.

  • The app will provide direct feedback on the scores.

  • Scoring positive above the cutoff or on certain domains (e.g. of PTSD, anxiety or depression - see below) may require more detailed follow assessments, e.g. with structured interviews for specific disorders.​

The GPS-T(11-17 years) in short

  • The Global Psychotrauma Screen (GPS) is a screening instrument designed to identify reactions to a severe stressor or potentially traumatic event (17 yes/no questions).

  • It also assesses risk or protective factors known to influence the course of symptoms (5 yes/no questions)

  • It can be used in different settings such as in primary care, after disaster, or in clinical practice.

  • The app will provide direct feedback on the scores.

  • Scoring positive above the cutoff or on certain domains (e.g. of PTSD, anxiety or depression - see below) may require more detailed follow assessments, e.g. with structured interviews for specific disorders.​

Languages

The GPC-C and GPS-T are available in:

 

GPS-C

GPS-T

Interested in validating your language version?

Please contact Emma Grace

The app version is currently being built.

Development and validation of the Global Psychotrauma Screen for Children and Adolescents

Project leader: Emma Grace

Project Group: Janka Ashford, Gabriel Baník, Esty Bar-Sade, Renée Beer, Elisabeth Biro, Atle Dyregrov, Anita Fjærestad, Evgenia Gkintoni,  Ioanna Koutsopoulou, Daniela Lempertz, Liora Machat, Miranda Olff, Nadezhda Semenova, Li Wang.

We are looking for collaborators on this project who can help us adapt and validate the GPS Child and Teen versions cross-nationally, analyze data, and work on a joint publication of the results, please contact Project Leader Emma Grace.

 

Aims and method

Recent research indicates that children and adolescents are underrepresented in the assessment and treatment for psychological trauma. This project group seeks to advance knowledge and evidence about the impact of adverse life events on child and adolescent population, and to provide free, valid, and reliable screening tools for traumatic symptoms. The aim of the GPS Child and Teen Project is to adapt the GPS adult version (Olff et al., 2020) for children and adolescents.

We have initially revised the GPS adult version for children and adolescents in American English. Using the expert and stakeholder consensus approach, we have completed semantic adaptation of the GPS with children and adolescents in the United States (Grace et al., 2021). The next step is to conduct a validation study of the adapted GPS-Child and GPS-Teen versions. In collaboration with the Global Child-EMDR Alliance members and other mental health professionals, the GPS-C and GPS-T have been translated from English into over 10 languages, while considering local contexts in each country. We invite researchers from around the world who are interested in translating, adapting, and validating the GPS Child and Adolescent versions in their countries to join the project.


User guide GPS-C.png
User guide GPS-T.png

GPS-C User Guide                 GPS-T User Guide

Publications

Grace, E., Sotilleo, Sh., Rogers, R., Doe, R., & Olff, M. (2021). Semantic adaptation of the Global Psychotrauma Screen for children and adolescents in the United States. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 12, (1). https://doi.org/10.1080/20008198.2021.1911080

Cao, C., Wang, L., Fang, R., Liu, P., Bi, Y., Luo, S., Grace, E., & Olff, M. (2021). Anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms among high school students in China in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown. Journal of Affective Disorders, 296. 126-129. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2021.09.052

Schermafbeelding 2021-05-06 om 14.19.53.